EagleHerald/Rick Gebhard  Tiffany Goodlet, Marinette, gives her chocolate labrador retriever Remington a treat Thursday in Marinette. The dog was shot Aug. 17 by a Marinette police officer. The bullet entry wound is visible just behind Remington’s left ear.
EagleHerald/Rick Gebhard
Tiffany Goodlet, Marinette, gives her chocolate labrador retriever Remington a treat Thursday in Marinette. The dog was shot Aug. 17 by a Marinette police officer. The bullet entry wound is visible just behind Remington’s left ear.

MARINETTE — The City of Marinette and its police department are currently reviewing the shooting of a local dog during an officer’s investigation of prank 911 calls which took place on Aug. 17. 

The dog in question, a chocolate labrador retriever by the name of Remington and affectionately known as “Remmi,” survived the shooting but remains in pain after the police department has refused to pay for veterinary treatment to remove the bullet from the shot. Remington belongs to Tiffany Goodlet, who resides at 3400 Pierce Ave., No. 675. 

The incident ending in the dog’s shooting began on the afternoon of Aug. 17, when Goodlet left her kids with a neighbor and went to buy school supplies for the upcoming school year. Goodlet’s daughter and her friend left the neighbor’s house and snuck back into the Goodlet home, where they sat on the patio and began eating ice cream and using the phone to dial 911 and hang up. According to a report from the police department, three officers were dispatched to investigate the calls, and parked around the corner nearby the house of Goodlet’s neighbor, Todd Smotucha. The report said that the three officers approached the Goodlet home together, and Remington greeted the first two officers without any issue but jumped on the third, who shot the dog in response. 

Smotucha, who was watching from his window during the incident, said he witnessed only one officer exit his vehicle alone around 2:20 p.m. on Aug. 12 and walk toward the Goodlet home, just entering the driveway before Remington came walking around the corner from the direction of the Goodlet family’s porch. 

“The dog didn’t touch him,” Smotucha said. 

In response to the dog’s appearance, Smotucha said the officer pulled out his handgun and fired a shot at the dog. The other two Marinette Police Department officers arrived several minutes after the shot was fired, he added, and were not initially on the scene as reported. 

Remington immediately fled the scene and did not reappear until several hours later. Goodlet said he was brought in for evaluation and treatment at the behest of a police officer, who said the Marinette Police Department would cover the costs. A veterinary analysis by the Fox Valley Animal Referral Center in Appleton revealed that the bullet entered just in front of Remington’s ear and traveled down toward his neck. No exit wound was found, and the bullet is believed to be lodged in his ribs. The veterinary hospital recommended surgery to remove the bullet, to the tune of over $5,000. 

Goodlet said the Marinette Police Department, upon hearing the amount of the veterinary bill, then refused to pay for the dog’s care. Because she could not afford the surgery, Remington returned home with the bullet still in him. 

Goodlet said the three-year-old Remington has no history of attacks, which the officers claimed had happened during the initial approach. The veterinary hospital also included in its report an assessment of the dog’s behavior during the examination of the wound, which stated, “Remington exhibited no aggressive tendencies while in the hospital, even when dealing with his painful wounds. He never growled, raised a lip or even looked at a staff member in anything but a friendly way. He is not a dangerous dog.” The report was provided by Goodlet. 

While Goodlet chose not to comment on the identity of the officer who shot Remington, Smotucha said he believed it to be Officer Matt Borths, currently employed by the Marinette Police Department as a K-9 officer. 

Marinette City Attorney Jonathan Sbar said that he would not comment on the situation in order to protect the integrity of the internal review the city conducts whenever a police officer discharges a firearm, which he said is a routine process. 

“We hope to be done with it shortly,” Sbar said of the review. 

Goodlet and her family and friends have started a GoFundMe account in the meantime for Remington’s treatment,www.gofundme.com/familt-pet-shot, which has raised $1,570 of its $5,200 goal for Remington’s veterinary bills, and a Facebook group called “Justice for Remington,” which can be found at www.facebook.com/groups/1931641850449189/. Goodlet added that she would be lodging a formal complaint with the City of Marinette today. 

“Remington is a good dog,” she said. “He wouldn’t hurt anyone.”