EagleHerald/Rick Gebhard
John Deschane, Crivitz Museum curator, left, and Dave Anderson, vice-president of the Crivitz-Stephenson Historical Society, look over the deconstructed Hergan Barn on site Thursday at the Crivitz Museum. It is a gambrel roof style barn, and will be reconstructed in the upcoming months to be an addition to the museum.
EagleHerald/Rick Gebhard

John Deschane, Crivitz Museum curator, left, and Dave Anderson, vice-president of the Crivitz-Stephenson Historical Society, look over the deconstructed Hergan Barn on site Thursday at the Crivitz Museum. It is a gambrel roof style barn, and will be reconstructed in the upcoming months to be an addition to the museum.

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CRIVITZ — The Hergan Barn, originally built in 1901, will be reconstructed by the Crivitz-Stephenson Historical Society as an addition to their museum in Crivitz. 

To help fund this venture, the Historical Society received a grant of $5,000 from the M&M Area Community Foundation to be used to build the foundation at the barn’s new location.

The barn was originally constructed by the Hergan family on their farm. They are one of the earliest families in the area and the building was once a primary asset on their farm. The Hergan family sold the farm about five or six years ago. 

The historical society reached out to the current owners of the farm to express their interest in the building. It was donated to them to be used in the Crivitz Museum. The barn has since been deconstructed and its wood relocated to the museum.

Dave Anderson, vice president of the Crivitz-Stephenson Historical Society, said that the next step to restoring the barn is to build a foundation at its new location. To construct the foundation, the society reached out to the M&M Area Community Foundation for financial assistance for the project.

“They offered a very generous amount,” Anderson said. The M&M Community Foundation gave the historical society a grant of $5,000 to begin the project.” 

The grant will be used to build the foundation on the barn’s new location, and the historical society has several plans for the barn once the project is completed. It plans on building an indoor display to present its collection of vintage farming tools. Currently, these tools are left outside and are exposed to weather and the elements.

“The equipment is very old and we want to protect it,” Anderson said.

The new display, which would be inside the barn, would allow for the tools to be shown to the public, and museum volunteers could still use them to educate the public on farming techniques.

The historical society also plans on dedicating a corner of the barn to a milking display that will show museum-goers old milking techniques.

“We probably won’t have a real cow,” Anderson said, but he added that he would love to have a way to educate the public on the milking techniques that would have been used on the farm.

Farming is an important part of the history and heritage of Crivitz, and the historical society is happy to have this new addition to the museum. Anderson said the society would like to have the project completed by the end of this year, but it will likely take longer.

This barn will be the fourth building on the museum’s campus, Anderson said. The museum also has a main building, a reconstructed log cabin, and honey moon cabin. Each of these buildings have displays of various rooms that reveal how people would have lived both at home and throughout town. 

Anderson said the museum has three major themes: Tourism, logging and farming. The Hergan Barn will be an addition to the farming theme, but he encourages everyone to check out the museum for their entire array of exhibits and buildings.

The Crivitz Museum is located at 104 S. Oak St. in Crivitz and is open from noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday until Labor Day.