Courtesy of Anuta Research Center
The commanding officers of the Menominee National Guard unit, a part of the Michigan 33rd Infantry, posed for this photo in 1916 as the local detachment prepared to embark for the Mexican Border. U.S. militia forces were summoned to the border to quell the uprising of Francisco “Poncho” Villa, a Mexican general and revolutionist who terrorized U.S. citizens along the border. From left: 1st Lt. Grover Thompson, Capt. Oscar Falk and 2nd Lt. Merritt “Tug” Wilson. Falk, a professional soldier, later died of battle wounds during World War I when the local guard unit was involved in the thick of the fight.
Courtesy of Anuta Research Center
The commanding officers of the Menominee National Guard unit, a part of the Michigan 33rd Infantry, posed for this photo in 1916 as the local detachment prepared to embark for the Mexican Border. U.S. militia forces were summoned to the border to quell the uprising of Francisco “Poncho” Villa, a Mexican general and revolutionist who terrorized U.S. citizens along the border. From left: 1st Lt. Grover Thompson, Capt. Oscar Falk and 2nd Lt. Merritt “Tug” Wilson. Falk, a professional soldier, later died of battle wounds during World War I when the local guard unit was involved in the thick of the fight.
The commanding officers of the Menominee National Guard unit, a part of the Michigan 33rd Infantry, posed for this photo in 1916 as the local detachment prepared to embark for the Mexican Border. U.S. militia forces were summoned to the border to quell the uprising of Francisco “Poncho” Villa, a Mexican general and revolutionist who terrorized U.S. citizens along the border. From left: 1st Lt. Grover Thompson, Capt. Oscar Falk and 2nd Lt. Merritt “Tug” Wilson. Falk, a professional soldier, later died of battle wounds during World War I when the local guard unit was involved in the thick of the fight.