Special to the EagleHerald<br>
Eighth-grade students at Crivitz Middle School watch as local veterinarian Dr. Linda Michalski, of Countryside Vet, does a live spay/neuter surgery on a cat recently in Shane Grave’s human anatomy and physiology class.
Special to the EagleHerald
Eighth-grade students at Crivitz Middle School watch as local veterinarian Dr. Linda Michalski, of Countryside Vet, does a live spay/neuter surgery on a cat recently in Shane Grave’s human anatomy and physiology class.
CRIVITZ — Eighth-grade students in Shane Graves’ human anatomy and physiology class had a one of a kind experience recently — being able to watch cats getting spayed and neutered right in their classroom.

Local veterinarian Dr. Linda Michalski, of Countryside Vet, performed the surgeries on cats who were pets of Crivitz school teachers. These teachers volunteered their pets to undergo the surgery, so students could experience it firsthand.

“Through this real-world experience, students learned the importance of spaying and neutering cats, to include the health benefits,” Graves said.

Not only did students learn about the importance of the surgery, but they were able to directly observe what they were learning in class.

Eighth-grade students Zach Fischer, Gabi Zietlow and Lyvia Caine said they liked watching the surgery because it made everything they learned more real.

“It’s something you don’t have the opportunity to see every day in person,” Zietlow said.

Caine said she enjoys watching vet shows on TV., so this made it real for her.

“It was cool to see it in real life,” she said. “Seeing it in person, makes it easier to understand instead of just reading the textbook.”

Fischer said while some of the process could be considered gross, he thought it was interesting.

“I thought it was interesting because I have a cat,” he explained. “I was able to see the surgery she went through.”

While Michalski and her technicians did the surgery, students were able to see major body organs and systems up close.

“I’ve always thought about going into the medical field (physical therapy),” Zietlow said. “This was cool to see up close and has helped a little bit in the decision.”

While some students watched from afar, others got right up in the action and watched.

“The kids really loved being able to view all of that,” Graves said. “Some of them thought it was kind of gross, other students were right up next to the surgery watching.

“I hope that students interests would be sparked to see a veterinarian at work right in the science lab at school.”